Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Poland is in the hands of Satan!


Over 330 exorcists from 29 countries around the world have arrived in Czestochowa for their annual behind-closed-doors meeting to discuss new ways of fighting Satan.

And what better place to exorcise the devil himself but Czestochowa, the home to the shrine of the Black Madonna and annual destination for many pilgrims.

European exorcists meet once a year, usually in Italy or Germany. This is their second meeting in Czestochowa.

And what do you think that the exorcists are talking about today? Well, it must be that the Devil, the cloven-hoofed one, is running riot among Poland’s politicians. In the last few days we have seen His terrible work on this land:

How else can we explain Father Radio Maryja Rydzyk calling the First Lady of Poland a witch (see previous post)? Rydzyk himself said that the ‘Rydzyk Tapes’ were the ‘work of Satan’?

How else can we explain Andrzej Lepper getting booted out of the government?

How else can we explain the resignation of sports minister Tomasz Lipiec?

How else can we explain the vice president of the Polish Olympic Committee, Artur Pilka, being sacked from his post after being detained by police for purchasing a kilogram of cocaine over a three to four year period. He claims that the Columbian snow was for 'personal use only'. Sniff, sniff. The ex-sports minister was apparently in charge of getting rid of doping in Polish sport. I would hate to see the state of his nostrils!

So the hand of evil must be at work in this land. But what will the Polish voter do about all this, if they get the chance?

Will they do the exorcists' work for them? Or will they decide that it is better to stick with the devil you know, than the devil you don’t?

27 comments:

sonia said...

There is a Polish saying: 'Where even the Devil cannot do the job, you should send a woman'...

Poland was always a matriarchal country. No witches were ever burned in Poland. Emilia Plater was an army colonel in 1830, the first female army colonel in history...

Those exorcists should get the same treatment as a Vatican inquisitor, Aloisius Lippomano, got in the 16th century when the Polish king expelled him from the country when he wanted to burn witches and heretics at a stake...

Polish Olympic Committee, Artur Pilka

Arthur Football...LOL...

eulogist said...

I wasn't so sure you were right that the Devil himself was behind all this.... until I heard that this unholy coalition had been put together again.

luridtraversal said...

Poland had better get on the ball and pass the resolution that would make Jesus "King of Poland". Then maybe and finally we can get all the Satanists, anarchists,homosexuals, feminists, jews, free-thinkers, liberals, abortionists (am I forgetting anyone) out of this country and we can go back to living in the Dark Ages...

Can someone give me a Hallelujah????

I dream of a couple well-placed bombs at the Radio Maryja station...

Can someone give me Hallelujah???

varus said...

Sonia, that was interesting about Plater, I’ll have to check it out.

Poland has a dual history: one of devout Catholicism and one of liberalism. Aloisius Lippomano saw what happens when these two histories collide. However, on the main they seem to coexist, and manage to complement each other in a way that does not often appear in other countries.

michael farris said...

"one of devout Catholicism"

I think this is a huge misconception.
I've never been impressed by the level of devoutness most people here show (I'm from the US south, which sets my 'devout' bar pretty high). But I've hardly ever had a conversation (with R Catholic Poles) about religious belief.

On the other hand, there's no particular word in English that does express the Polish relation to the church (which is strong, especially in the countryside).

A peculiarity of the church in Poland is that it serves as a political voice for those who are displeased with the form of government in Poland.

In communist times, it functioned as a kind of de facto opposition party and after communism fell, most Polish people wanted (quite in vain) for the church to withdraw from politics.
Radio Maryja fits right into that tradition, giving people who don't like democracy and capitalism (in their polish incarnations) a way of organizing into a political bloc.

beatroot said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
beatroot said...

From what I can see Polish Catholicism is amazingly complex….but no more so than Irish Catholicism (though they are different, and not so alike as is often painted).

The recent census by the Church found that 45 percent go to mass. If you look at where this 45% come from then the east of the country, and small towns, make up the majority of those.

Out of that majority, as in Ireland, Poles are rather pragmatic in what they take from the Mass. Respect, they do, and then often they go outn and do something completely opposite to what they have heard.

And being part of the Church is as much about community – a very important idea in those areas – as it is about Religion.

So ‘Poles’ ‘devoutness’ is a mistake. In fact, a Polish “Catholic identity’ is much much more about ethnicity as it is about religion.

michael farris said...

Quick difference between Polish and Irish catholicism (warning, warning, anecdote ahead):

Some years ago an Irish colleague was being visited by his married-with-children sister.

Later, he said one of her first remarks in Poland was:

"If these girls are Catholic, then why are their skirts so short?"

He also said (more than once) that from his perspective Irish people were far more conservative socially than Poles.

heat_seeker said...

Varus said: Poland has a dual history: one of devout Catholicism and one of liberalism.

Poland self-professed "liberalism" is nothing else than opportunism. It surfaces only when there is a tangible benefit to be derived by the the ruling class. It does not have a basis in broadly held allegiance to principles of progress, individual freedoms and protection from arbitrary authority.

WRT devotion (superficial religiosity...?) to Catholic Church, I must agree with BR,it has very little to do with religion and everything to do with national identity. Corollary being, if you are not Catholic you cannot be considered a true Polak.

beatroot said...

Irish people were far more conservative socially than Poles.

That's the kind of thing I meant. Although, in the last couple of decades, things have changed big time in Ireland.

The Irish have also been ruled much more by the Church than in Poland (Ireland was never in the Soviet empire). The Church is slowly being got rid of from the government of Ireland. Here. well...

Renegade Eye said...

What is amazing is how your previous post, compliments this post.

I can't imagine how enraged you must be, in such a parochial enviroment. I think your humor protects you from rage.

michael farris said...

"Corollary being, if you are not Catholic you cannot be considered a true Polak"

In theory, in practice it's not quite so important. Adam MaƂysz is a protestant as is former prime minister Jerzy Buzek. I'm sure that no one is going to say either isn't Polish.

Another factor to consider is that when surveyed as to your religion, saying you're RCatholic in Poland is sort of like 'no comment'. That is, as the default category, if you say you're RC then you don't have to say anything else. Saying you're something else tends to mean people expect you to explain why you're not RC. There's a good chunk of the population that calls themselves catholic but you'd never guess by their behavior.

roman said...

luridtraversal,

"I dream of a couple well-placed bombs at the Radio Maryja station..."

Is religious tollerance a foreign concept to you?

Harry said...

^ Roman:

Tolerate everything except intolerance. For that have no tolerance and no pity.


Not my own words.

george w. said...

Thank you, Harry, for recognizing my wisdom.

"Tolerate everything except intolerance. For that have no tolerance and no pity."

Gabriel said...

To comment on the Lepper story:

Macdac does it again, this time with even more fitting lyrics:

http://wideo.gazeta.pl/wideo/0,0,4311468.html


/Why not a Lepperchaun movie too... "I want me gold.."

roman said...

harry,

John Rawls "the intolerant must be tolerated but only insofar as they do not endanger the tolerant society and its institutions."

Works both ways, doesn't it?
I don't want to get into a pissing contest here but only to point out that violence is wrong no matter whether its perpetrated by the tolerant or the intolerant side.
Blowing up a radio station is a bit extreme, don't you think?
I'm surprised that beatroot did not immediately condemn this kind of hair-brained and irresponsible comment and you for defending it.

luridtraversal said...

Roman said: Is religious tollerance a foreign concept to you?

Hey, I'm a really tolerant person, just a person who finds Radio Maryja and it's supporters an absolute travesty. You think those people are tolerant of my views and beliefs??? If so you're as deluded as your comment. I never advocated the killings of anybody...just the destruction of a radio station that I find offensive to me. Maybe the comment was quite titillating, but it's my opinion on the matter. I'm one of the most tolerant people in the world. I'm honestly sick of these people meddling or trying to meddle in my affairs. Unlike you Roman, I live in this country.

And tolerance??? From people who call for the euthanasia and or beatings, murder of those who support gay-rights, or reproductive rights??? Right. I'm intolerant.

roman said...

luridtraversal,

"Unlike you Roman, I live in this country."
That is true but why make this statement? Are you suggesting that opinions from Poles who happen to be outside the country carry less weight?
Radio Maryja would not be on the air if it did not have a substantial amount of listeners and hence a sizeable audience. Can you see why your call to eliminate this media source can be construed by someone like myself as intollerant censorship? Come-on, be honest :))

beatroot said...

I could not support a ban of Maryja. Life would be sooo dull without these nutters. It is better to let these types of freaks speak so we can have the opotunity to ridicule them. Free speach for all...

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