Thursday, April 27, 2006

Totally PiS-ed off!


Poles grown with boredom and irritation as, nearly eight months after the general election, the Law and Justice (PiS) led government fails, yet again, to form a working coalition.

Will this charade ever end?

A coalition has just been signed, but it’s 19 votes short of a parliamentary majority. Which means, if my meager mathematics is correct, that this is no coalition at all.

Zzzz

We were told before the election in September that two parties with Solidarity roots - Law and Justice (PiS) and Civic Platform (PO) – would form a coalition. They didn’t.

Then we were told that a ‘Stability pact’ between PiS, the rural proletarian, radical Self defense, and the catholic-nationalist League of Polish Families, would get necessary legislation through parliament. The stability pact was signed but never materialized.

We were told three weeks ago that a coalition between the same parties was close to being finalized. And then it wasn’t.

Two weeks ago we were told that a coalition between…something!...anything!...would be formed. It wasn’t.

And then we were told yesterday that a coalition between PiS, Self defense, bits of the League of Polish Families (a split within that party has made it the League of Broken Polish Families) and the Polish Peasant’s Party, would agreed today.

Then the Polish Peasant’s Party pulled out this afternoon.

And now, as I write, a ‘coalition’ between PiS, Self defense, but without many of the League of Polish Families, has been agreed. Unfortunately, this means that the coalition (that isn’t) is 19 votes short of a majority in parliament. Which means they still have to get support from outside the ‘coalition’ to govern the country properly.

Roman Giertych, leader of the League, says that he is 'ready to talk'. But, then again, he has been 'talking' for months. And nothing has happened.

The government says that it will not be naming any new ministers until next Friday.

Jaroslaw Kaczynski (chairman of PiS, in photo) is saying that he hopes to persuade the rest of the League of Polish Families to join them. In which case, he says, “we will rule until 2009”.

Ha, ha, bloody ha! Knowing the current political class as Poles do, this is a very optimistic analysis.

What a pathetic bunch of losers.

The country has lots of problems and needs strong and decisive leadership. But finding that kind of political leadership in Poland at the moment is like the blind man, in a dark room, looking for the black cat…that isn’t there!

The beatroot’s position on this has been clear for a long while now: give us a new election and the Polish voter will sort out the mess.

Maybe.

For more comment see Does a radical Polish farmer now control Poland?, from the guys at Polish Outlook

25 comments:

sonia said...

The Poles think they are Italians...

Actually, the Italians didn't have a stable governing coalition for 3 decades after WWII and they were doing just fine...

Polska nierzadem stoi...
(Poland stands in anarchy)

Michael Farris said...

Either PiS is led by people of almost unimaginable incompetence or they don't want a coalition. I tend toward the latter explanation.

If they actually have a coalition they'll, you know, have to do something. And if they do something they're liable to be held responsible for it, a prospect they want to escape at almost any cost.

They're hoping to non-govern and be able to blame everybody else and be re-elected so that they can non-govern some longer. And considering the sort of idiocy they're liable to get up to if they do ever get a majority coalition (it will be by accident if it happens) I'm just as happy to let them muddle on for a while.

Eugene said...

It's very suprising to see how many Western Europeans gladly supported and welcomed the Left Wing government of SLD (when they were in power), consisting of numerous former communists who either had family members belonging to that party, or had close ties with the NKVD. That doesn't mean anything to you, correct? Even the Left wing oriented media in Poland (the majority falls into this category) and abroad are attempting to do an "image job" on the current government. You must understand Polish history very well prior to ridiculing the position of the Right who are in power and calling them 'a bunch of losers'. It's a typical pro-Leftist remark when there is no valid argument in hand. Name calling is not exactly the intellectual way to reason and debate. It's more of a cheap shot to convey your point without an argument. Throughout Polish history, it has been the Poles and church versus the communists or soviets (who ruled and suppressed Poland for over 40 years after the war), and were on par with the Nazis in the dismantling of the Polish state. Would you rather see a party in power that has ties to former communists, or one that that has roots in the opposition to that logic? You have already answered that question. Given some more time, let's see what the political Right can do for Poland before degrading them. So far, nothing detrimental has actually occurred. Please list for us here on this forum, any serious negative repercussions that have resulted so far from the current governments rule. Investments are now pouring in at an even faster rate, Kaczynski would like to mend political ties with Russia and Germany, Poland is seeking alternative energy solutions, life is still advancing normally, and the zloty still remains stable. If the results of their policies are negative after 'a generous time frame', then rightfully chew them apart. I would like to note that when the 'coalition' agreement was signed, the Financial Times reported the Polish currency markets remained stable on that day.

Becca said...

'Would you rather see a party in power that has ties to former communists, or one that that has roots in the opposition to that logic? '

I'd be happy to see a party in power that doesn't have to bow to the demands of populist, anti-european, homophobic, xenophobic lunatics like Lepper and his friends.

Anyway, I thought the zloty had suffered, that the political reputation of Polish politics had been damaged and that foreign investment was more related to Poland being part of the EU now...

Even if we ignore all that and say nothing detrimental has occured, it's undeniable that the situation is a total farce.

Michael Farris said...

"Name calling is not exactly the intellectual way to reason and debate."

Do the name 'układ' ring a bell? What about 'kanalia'? How closely do you follow the Polish media?

"Would you rather see a party in power that has ties to former communists, or one that that has roots in the opposition to that logic?"

In Poland, really, there's not _that_ much difference. No, really, there isn't. And, the ones who talk most about the difference now are the closest to the communists in governing style. The Kaczynskis don't exactly have a good track record of dealing with dissent or disagreement or being able to actually work well with anyone at all.

There are lots more important things to worry about in Polish politics than their behavior 17 years ago.

In the former East Germany or Romania things might be different. But Poland was a different kind of place

Anonymous said...

The name Beatroot called PiS was "pathetic bunch of losers". He provided ample evidence that this - from the point of view of ordinary Poles - is in fact the case. Having once been opposed to communism (and continuing to trumpet it from the rooftops) is no excuse for incompetence. PiS is using a nation of 39 million people to play party politics, settle old scores and advance their own personal careers. Right or left, they are a disgrace.

beatroot said...

Eugene: You must understand Polish history very well prior to ridiculing the position of the Right who are in power and calling them 'a bunch of losers'. It's a typical pro-Leftist remark when there is no valid argument in hand.

First of all, I was refering not just to PiS but to the whole of the Polish political class!.

As to the name calling...sorry but the antics of the past seven months (and maybe the last 16 years) is all the evidence I need to justify calling them a bunch of losers, because that is what they are and they have failed the Polish people totally.

And what is all this left wing thing about? If you look through this blog I spend as much time bashing the liberal lefties as I do the conservatives.

And anyway, PiS are left wing economically (more so than the SLD), and right wing conservative, socially.

Eugene said...

Becca Said:

"I'd be happy to see a party in power that doesn't have to bow to the demands of populist, anti-european, homophobic, xenophobic lunatics like Lepper and his friends."

PIS isn't 'bowing' into *all* of their demands. They are making concessions which are quite normal in coalition negotiations. This coalition is primarily being created to prevent the PO-SLD from taking power. I see you also have a penchant for name calling and categorizing. So, it would be fair game to consider the Center-Left as anti-Catholic and Marxist as well, right? The PO-SLD clan also has the proud backing of "Nie". Is that something to be proud of?

"Anyway, I thought the zloty had suffered..."

Incorrect Rebecca, please research this more carefully. My source is "Oanda Currency Rates" in the following example. Here are two historical exchange rates, from the time PIS was voted in, until today:

On October 23, 2005 (PIS takes office), 1 Euro = 3.9091 Zloty and 1 USD = 3.2701. Today, 1 Euro = 3.87815 Zloty and 1 USD = 3.1070. In both cases, the Polish Zloty has relatively gained against two major world currencies. Financial markets have also been doing quite well, with the WIG even outpacing Western indexes.

"...that the political reputation of Polish politics had been damaged and that foreign investment was more related to Poland being part of the EU now..."

The polical situation was initially damaged due mainly to the Unicredit stance. Since then, not only has an agreement been signed, but the Polish government gained favorable concessions from it as well. If world investors thought PIS to be such a threat, the rate of investment into Poland would have slowed down. That didn't happen. On the contrary, investments have steadily increased. Any frugal investor would only invest if they knew the situation wouldn't be a hinderance. I also invested in Poland, a great deal of capital, and I'm remaining here because things are fine.

"Even if we ignore all that and say nothing detrimental has occured, it's undeniable that the situation is a total farce."

For some individuals that may have liberal, Left oriented views, the situation is a farce, for others, it isn't. Some components of the media are also responsible for 'image manipulation' for their own benefit. So, in whose eyes is it a farce? CBOS, NY Times, NIE, or other? Let us see how the political situation unfolds, and give them a fair allocation of time to prove themselves. They haven't been in office for one year yet.


Michael Farris said:

"In Poland, really, there's not _that_ much difference. No, really, there isn't. And, the ones who talk most about the difference now are the closest to the communists in governing style. The Kaczynskis don't exactly have a good track record of dealing with dissent or disagreement or being able to actually work well with anyone at all."

Oh? In Poland, the legacy of communism and it's horrible effects -does- really make a enormous difference. Poles know this better than anyone else that have suffered from it. You are talking about individuals (in post democratic political parties) that either personally belonged to socialist organizations prior to 1990, and those whose parents clinged to those philosophies before them.

"There are lots more important things to worry about in Polish politics than their behavior 17 years ago."

Michael, tell me, you don't equate the misdeeds of Nazism to those of Stalinism? The former ended in 1945 with the Allied victory, the latter continued up until 1989. It permeated Polish society to a horrible extent. People here remember it. I agree that one shouldn't dwell on the past, however, many groups are investigating the past on war crimes to this present day. There are many individuals today in Poland with strong roots in communism, and Kaczynski vowed to weed them out of the political sphere. Prior to 1990, the Bolsheviks did the same to democratic Poles. That was one of his promises when he was elected, and the people did elect him. He started with dimissing a number of foreign Polish diplomats, and would now like an honest answer about Katyn, which the guilty refuses to acknowledge. Why doesn't Putin reveal the names of the individuals involved?

"In the former East Germany or Romania things might be different. But Poland was a different kind of place"

Can you please explain that a little more in detail?

Eugene said...

Anonymous said...
"The name Beatroot called PiS was "pathetic bunch of losers". He provided ample evidence that this - from the point of view of ordinary Poles - is in fact the case."

One single individual can never represent the view of 39 million in unison. I consider his comments to be only his personal opinion, and not sufficient 'evidence'.

"Having once been opposed to communism (and continuing to trumpet it from the rooftops) is no excuse for incompetence."

Let's be realistic. It is obvious that 'most' of the politicians in Poland today are not incompetent. Most do have appropriate university educations and qualifying experience, and for those lacking both attributes, they only have their experience, good looks, can talk very effectively, or they sleep with the right person. So, for the three latter items, in your definition, you might say incompetent education wise.

"PiS is using a nation of 39 million people to play party politics, settle old scores and advance their own personal careers. Right or left, they are a disgrace."

They were democratically voted into power by the majority of these 39 million, but again, so were Lech Wałęsa and Aleksander Kwasniewski before them.

The message I am trying to convey is, any political party that rules Poland, whether it be Right-Center-Left, should be given a fair chance before throwing them to the meat grinder. Let's see what this coalition has to offer for a generous period of time. If they do indeed wreck this country, then let's sack them, media wise and politically. However, please, let's all provide concrete examples of their positive contributions, or their negative failures, and not hot air.

beatroot said...

Seven months is a fair period of time. The evidence is their in front of your eyes...

Politics and politicians get a bad rap in Poland and the profession is looked at with contemp. Consequently, the only individuals who want to go into politics are intellectually challenged, psychotic, mutant alians.

That's why they are such a bunch of losers.

sonia said...

Eugene,

it has been the Poles and church versus the communists or soviets

Not quite, Eugene. The Church collaborated with the Communists just like the majority of the population. True, under Pius XII, the Polish Church resisted (Cardinal Wyszynski was even arrested), but after John XXIII and Paul VI came to power the church was following (very reluctantly), not leading, the resistance to Communism. They didn't support the dissidents in 1968 or the workers in 1970.Things improved again under John Paul II, but that's another story.

My point is, Eugene, that left-wing intellectual dissidents like Kuron, Michnik, etc. were far more courageous in standing up to the Communists than right-wing Catholic nationalists. Does the name "Piasecki" ring a bell? PAX? Right-wing intellectuals like Maria Dabrowska eulogizing Stalin openly, while writing her anti-semitic memoirs in secret...

Michael Farris said...

"tell me, you don't equate the misdeeds of Nazism to those of Stalinism? The former ended in 1945 with the Allied victory, the latter continued up until 1989."

Stalinism stricto sensu ended shortly after his death. After that (in Poland) you had middling authoritarian rule (worse than anything in the West, but better than a lot of the third world) with alternating periods of (comparitive)liberalization and repression. If Stalinism, real Stalinism had been the system of Poland in 1989 there would have been no and change of political system because the entire solidarity apparatus would have been liquidated. You degrade the real horrors of Stalinism if you're seriously trying to say that the Polish government in the 1980's was comparable.

"There are many individuals today in Poland with strong roots in communism, and Kaczynski vowed to weed them out of the political sphere."

This is so far from the most pressing problem in Poland that it isn't funny. His campaign soft-peddaled the PiS desire to purge the ideologically impure in favor of saving old people's retirement funds and building 3 million free apartments (a promise they dropped so fast after the election it was hilarious).

I'd be in favor of prosecuting those guilty of crimes, but the Kaczynskis set the bar _way_ too low.

"Can you please explain that a little more in detail?"

Short answer: the Soviet bloc in Eastern Europe was made up of different countries with somewhat different systems and governing styles. None were good, but some were worse than others. Poland was the least bad in most ways. Romania and East Germany were the worst. Romania did have Stalinist elements up to the very end of communism which is why they had the most violent takeover and have since lagged politically. Albania was even worse, but it wasn't a Soviet ally.

Anonymous said...

Eugene wrote:
"Let's be realistic. It is obvious that 'most' of the politicians in Poland today are not incompetent. Most do have appropriate university educations and qualifying experience..."

I find it extraordinary the number of people in Eastern Europe who think a university education is a prerequisite for public office. It's typically communist, only this time the social class to be idolised is not the working class. The point of democracy is that "we the people" not "we the well-educated, well-heeled elite" run the show. Can anyone remind me: which university did Lech Walesa go to?

Similarly, Ziobro has every right to disagree with the learned professors of the Constitutional Tribunal who are trying to keep the horrid oiks out of the legal profession. The fact that they are doctors and profs and the minister is only a humble "magister" is irrelevant. He was elected, the nasty little shit. They weren't.

Beatroot is right: seven months is quite long enough to decide (as many Poles have according to the opinion polls) that PiS is failing their voters (though from the point of view of their own narrow party interests things they're doing a little better).

Eugene wrote:
"I'm remaining here because things are fine."

I take it you're not gay, then.

Eugene said...

Sonia said:

"Not quite, Eugene. The Church collaborated with the Communists just like the majority of the population."

Wrong Sonia, the church in Poland didn't 'collaborate' with the communists, for they were crudely suppressed and ruled by them from post WWII right up to the 1980's. The Roman Catholic Church in Poland was communism's most consistent and successful adversary.

"True, under Pius XII, the Polish Church resisted (Cardinal Wyszynski was even arrested), but after John XXIII and Paul VI came to power the church was following (very reluctantly), not leading, the resistance to Communism."

You are obviously attempting to minimize the role Poland's Catholic church played in the transformation to democracy and defeat of communism in Poland, implying that the credit only belongs to the Polish workers (KOR) movement and Warsaw’s dissident intellectuals. I see part of your point in stating that although the church from Rome via those two popes weren't so vocal, the entire church within Poland played a more independent active role, as Catholics themselves did.

"They didn't support the dissidents in 1968 or the workers in 1970.Things improved again under John Paul II, but that's another story."

John Paul isn't a different story at all. He was a pivotal player in the defeat of communism.

"My point is, Eugene, that left-wing intellectual dissidents like Kuron, Michnik, etc. were far more courageous in standing up to the Communists than right-wing Catholic nationalists."

It was the coalition of workers and intellectuals (KOR), operating largely under the protective and influencial sphere of Poland's Roman Catholic church, that in fact instigated the process of dismantling soviet domination. The pope's visit to Poland in 1979 provided that drive with national, patriotic, and ethical dimensions.

As American journalist Tom Piatak has written: "The bare facts are these: the institution in Poland that gave dissidents, even secular intellectuals, the civic space to operate during the years of Soviet rule was the Catholic Church. The “Polish workers” who began the revolt that ended up toppling the Soviet Union were the workers at the Lenin shipyard in Gdansk, who during their historic strike decorated the main gate of the shipyard with precisely two pictures—one of John Paul II, one of Our Lady of Czestochowa. (Leon Trotsky was nowhere in sight.) The leader of those workers was Lech Walesa, who posed in his first photograph after the strike under a crucifix, who afterwards customarily wore an icon of Our Lady of Czestochowa on his lapel, who signed the Gdansk agreement ending the strike with a souvenir pen bearing the likeness of John Paul II, and who left his Nobel Peace Prize as a votive offering at the Jasna Gora monastery where the famous icon of Our Lady is found. All of these symbolic gestures were carefully considered and show the profoundly Catholic nature of the peaceful Polish revolt that ended up discrediting Bolshevism in both its Stalinist and Trotskyist variants. Regardless of their views on other issues, Poles credit John Paul’s epochal 1979 visit with inspiring all that followed."

Does the name "Piasecki" ring a bell? PAX?

Those are minor exceptions to the majority. They were not representative of what most Catholic Poles felt about communism.

"Right-wing intellectuals like Maria Dabrowska eulogizing Stalin openly, while writing her anti-semitic memoirs in secret..."

The mentioning of one such intellectual doesn't prove anything. I can also state that Julian Tuwim wrote: "Our land is vast, but it does not contain a single square kilometer where people would not mourn the death of their beloved brother, defender, teacher, legislator of their consciences: Josef Stalin." That also doesn't prove anything.

Eugene said...

Anonymous said...

Eugene wrote:

"I find it extraordinary the number of people in Eastern Europe who think a university education is a prerequisite for public office. It's typically communist, only this time the social class to be idolised is not the working class. The point of democracy is that "we the people" not "we the well-educated, well-heeled elite" run the show. Can anyone remind me: which university did Lech Walesa go to?"

I did mention "qualifying experience" as another important component of competency, or did you miss that? Although Lech Wałęsa lacked the higher education that 'most' politicians possess, he did have the qualities of experience, common sense, public speaking, and skill in negotiations. Even so, often when he made public speeches, the media took great amusement in dicrediting his language abilities as unprofessional and too simple.

"Beatroot is right: seven months is quite long enough to decide (as many Poles have according to the opinion polls) that PiS is failing their voters (though from the point of view of their own narrow party interests things they're doing a little better)."

The CBOS opinion polls are based on a '1000 or 1500-adult population random address sample'. Again, please provide several tangible examples where the current government has failed considerably.

"I take it you're not gay, then."

I'm not. Is that the sole, primary crux of your dislike of the current government? I'm here just as are numerous major Fortune 500 firms, right down to the smaller investors. The investment environment is excellent and potential profit margins are high.

Michael Farris said...

Eugene, you seem to have a fine appreciation for Lech Walesa's role in the collapse of communism (as do I). You do realize, don't you, that the Kaczynski brothers pretty much hate him and have accused him of being a communist spy/dupe? That is how they made it to the bigtime after all.

My own opinion is they realize the dangers of the populist trap; do nothing and your base gets angry, try to follow your electoral program with usually grim results in the real world.
They (or rather Jarosław) has come up with an ingenious solution, do nothing, fail to form a true majority coalition so you can blame not doing anything on other people instead of the inherent unworkability of the plan in the first place.
I sincerely hope the voters don't fall for it.

Anonymous said...

Re: Eugene
"Is that [PiS homophobia] the sole, primary crux of your dislike of the current government?"

No, but it figures quite high, as it should to any civilised person.

"The investment environment is excellent and potential profit margins are high."

So it's screw the minorities just as long as you can repatriate your profits back to the US?

"Again, please provide several tangible examples where the current government has failed considerably."

The point is that PiS has achieved little or nothing for Poland: it is very hard to prove such a negative (what am I to do: name all the things they haven't achieved? Okay: they haven't put a Pole on the moon for one thing). Let me ask you something much easier: give examples of notable PiS successes. (The fact that Poland has not fallen apart since the elections is not a notable success.)

"The CBOS opinion polls are based on a '1000 or 1500-adult population random address sample'"

That's how opinion polls are done. Do you expect CBOS to ask everyone in the country? There's a word for that and its "election".

"Even so, often when he [Walesa] made public speeches, the media took great amusement in dicrediting his language abilities as unprofessional and too simple."

But that's just the point I was making in the first place: polish and education should not matter in electing public representatives. A large number of East Europeans seem to think it does: witness the scorn heaped on poor Lech (Kaczynski) for not speaking English or German.

"I did mention 'qualifying experience' as another important component of competency"

If "qualifying experience" were a requirement for engaging in politics, by your logic Poland could never have had a democracy since the only people in 1989 with "qualifying experience" were members of the communist establishment. Apart from age and perhaps mental health there can be no entrance requirements for politics. It's not a job in a Fortune 500 company. If you think politicians should have "competence" for their jobs does it not follow that voters should too? Perhaps we could weight votes: a PhD would get 10 votes and a BA only 1. There would of course be no need to burden illiterates with things they didn't understand.

Henry Grodsk said...

The rats are leaving the sinking ship. Meller's gone.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4955654.stm

beatroot said...

Meller is the Foreign Minister, for those that don't know. Who's next? Finance Minister looks wobbley. Sikorski was rumoured to want Meller's old job. He would be good. It would get him away from the rest of the cronies.

sonia said...

Eugen,

Have you read this book and this book? If you had, you might change your mind about the importance of the Catholic Church in resisting Communism...

Eugene said...

Michael Farris said:

"They (or rather Jarosław) has come up with an ingenious solution, do nothing, fail to form a true majority coalition so you can blame not doing anything on other people instead of the inherent unworkability of the plan in the first place."

I don't think their failure to form a majority coalition was intentional. It appeared to be the lack of agreeable attributes in the negotiation process. They still would rather prefer that majority. It's going to be interesting to see the outcome within the next couple of days.

Anonymous said:

"So it's screw the minorities just as long as you can repatriate your profits back to the US?"

Not at all. I sympathize with anyone that feels discriminated against in any country. However, I'm focusing more on establishing my investment here than anything else. I plan to reinvest any profits back into the Polish economy.

"Let me ask you something much easier: give examples of notable PiS successes."

It is true there hasn't been major noteworthy successes just as there hasn't been any considerable setbacks. As I mentioned previously, the government did win some nice concessions from the Unicredit deal, they are attempting to mend relations with Germany and Russia, seeking alternative energy reserves, and other minor issues. An important indicator though is how outside investors feel about the country, and they do feel good about investing here. That's an important plus. This could be a record year in that matter. Other litmus tests are the financial markets and value of the Polish zloty in relation to major world currencies, both favorable.

"That's how opinion polls are done. Do you expect CBOS to ask everyone in the country?"

I know, I studied statistics. The point is, one polling organization such as CBOS shouldn't represent the official voice of the atmosphere in Poland. Their opinion is valuable though.

"If "qualifying experience" were a requirement for engaging in politics, by your logic Poland could never have had a democracy since the only people in 1989 with "qualifying experience" were members of the communist establishment. Apart from age and perhaps mental health there can be no entrance requirements for politics. It's not a job in a Fortune 500 company."

The definition of competency can be analyzed and translated into many different ways, in many layers, by many inidividuals. It's obviously a debatable issue beyond the scope of this topic. This is why it's ludicrous to designate someone outright as competent or incompetent. However, the fact is, many politicians do have strong legal backgrounds, as well as other impressive educational credentials and/or qualifying experience. Most, if not all US senators are lawyers if I'm not mistaken.

Henry Grodsk said:

"The rats are leaving the sinking ship. Meller's gone."

Stefan Meller was actually a very impressive governmental representative, not a rat.
:-)
As beatroot mentioned, he was the Foreign Minister. Any takers here for that position? Jobs vacancies in the government are opening up fast!

Sonia, no, I haven't read those books you mentioned. Excellent historical publications are Norman Davies "God's Playground" and "Europe: A History".

Eugene said...

beatroot said...

"Jaroslaw Kaczynski (chairman of PiS, in photo) is saying that he hopes to persuade the rest of the League of Polish Families to join them. In which case, he says, “we will rule until 2009”...Ha, ha, bloody ha! Knowing the current political class as Poles do, this is a very optimistic analysis...What a pathetic bunch of losers...The beatroot’s position on this has been clear for a long while now: give us a new election and the Polish voter will sort out the mess."

It seems like the beatroot's position on this subject has just been boiled down to some distasteful Barszcz. Kaczynski was quite accurate, the majority coalition has been successfully formed today with Marcinkiewicz's blessing, and the financial markets (important litmus test) weren't negatively phased as well. Don't count your Buraki until they're harvested. Now, let the public objectively judge what this coalition is capable of doing (after a "fair" amount of time), as opposed to petty name calling, unecessary political classifications, and slanderous accusations. If they do indeed prove disasterous subsequent to a generous term, then it's time to justifiably dissect them. If the opposite occurs, you should personally congratulate them. Again, every political party deserves a fair, untainted chance. All eyes will now be upon them.

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